New Online Banking Trojan Empties Users’ Wallets, Videos Privates

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Bank account-raiding Trojan Hesperbot has infected computers in UK, Turkey, the Czech Republic and Portugal, The Register has learned.

Net security firm Eset said the software nasty is distributed via rather convincing-looking emails, which are dressed up as legit package tracking documents from postal companies or correspondence from an internet provider and other outfits.

These messages try to trick marks into downloading and running a malicious Windows executable, cunningly named with a .pdf.exe file extension.

Once installed, Hesperbot can silently snoop on passwords by logging a user’s keystrokes, take screenshots, record from a video camera if one is connected, intercept network traffic, and pipe all this snaffled data to the crooks’ command server. The Trojan can also set up a hidden VNC service, allowing miscreants to remotely log in and take control of the computer.

Armed with this information, crooks can try to log into victims’ online bank accounts to siphon off their cash.

And on top of that, marks are persuaded to install software on their Symbian, Blackberry or Android phone, which is the mobile malware component of Hesperbot.

It’s estimated hundreds people have fallen for the scam in Turkey, and dozens in each of the Czech Republic, Portugal, the United Kingdom.

“Analysis of the threat revealed that we were dealing with a banking trojan, with similar functionality and identical goals to the infamous Zeus and SpyEye, but significant implementation differences indicated that this is a new malware family, not a variant of a previously known trojan,” said Robert Lipovsky, ESET malware researcher who leads the team analysing the malware.

More details can be found in a report here.

Source: The Register

Study: 86% Of U.S. Adults Make Efforts To Hide Digital Footprints Online

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In one of the latest developments in the fallout of the PRISM story, the ACLU is currently suing four officials in the Obama Administration to try to get federal courts to put a stop to the NSA’s metadata program and delete all existing records. But if you ask the general U.S. population, as surveyed by the Pew Research Center, the average U.S. citizen appears to be more concerned about the data-collecting abilities of advertising networks like those of Google and Facebook, faceless malicious hackers, and even friends and family, than they are the government.

In this latest installment of its ongoing Internet & American Life research, Pew found that 86 percent of surveyed adult Internet users in the U.S. have made efforts to obscure their “digital footprints” — which could include simple measures like clearing cookies in your browser or something more involved like encrypting your email. Some 55 percent have taken this one step further by trying to block specific people or organizations — services like Disconnect.me, for example, have built an entire business on creating these tools.

But it is a sign of just how nebulous and pervasive privacy concerns are today that these efforts are not directed solely at state or government groups — despite all the recent attention from the PRISM revelations and the government’s role in gathering data.

“[Users’] concerns apply to an entire ecosystem of surveillance,” writes Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet Project and one of the report’s authors. “In fact, they are more intent on trying to mask their personal information from hackers, advertisers, friends and family members than they are trying to avoid observation by the government.”

Read more by clicking the source link below.

Source:  Pew Research Center, Tech Crunch