Android malware tool iBanking commands $5000 price for attackers

image

Evolving malicious tool adopts service model, grows increasingly complex

The market for malware tools is expanding, including the purchase of pre-made tools for a hefty fee from underground developers. One such tool aimed at Android, iBanking, promises to conduct a number of malicious actions including intercepting text messages, stealing phone information, pulling geolocation data and constructing botnets with infected devices. All it would cost to obtain the program is $5000, even after its source code leaked earlier in the year.

The iBanking malware has evolved from simply being able to steal SMS information, but has grown to be a much larger Trojan tool for would be data thieves. Applications injected with the iBanking code have hit the marketplace costumed as legitimate banking and social media apps as a way for users to be convinced to use them.

The apps often appear to users who have already been infected on desktop machines, prompting them to fill in personal information which then leads to an SMS message with a download link. Once the app is downloaded and installed, it begins feeding information to the attacker.

According to Symantec the tool is “one of the most expensive pieces of malware” the company has seen, especially for one with that sets up a service business. Other malware applications have paved the way for things like customer support and HTML control panels, but not at such a high price.

Part of the larger problem with iBanking is that it resists most attempts to reverse engineer the software, giving it a better strength against those trying to craft similar tools says an article from Ars Technica. iBanking uses encryption and code obfuscation to hide the commands and actions it carries out. This prevents researchers from breaking down the process of the malware, as well as keeping others from using the code to clone more software.

Source: Electronista

Implant Device for Stopping Uncontrolled Seizures

image

Surgeons at Comprehensive Epilepsy Center Say Pacemaker-like RNS System Provides Innovative Approach to Stop Seizures Before They Start

Newswise — NYU Langone Medical Center last month became the first hospital outside of a clinical trial site to implant a pacemaker-like device in the brain that may be a game-changer for patients with epilepsy.

The device, called the RNS System, was implanted April 17, 2014 in a patient with seizures that previously could not be controlled with medication, or intractable epilepsy, by Werner Doyle, MD, an associate professor in the Department of Neurosurgery at NYU Langone. The patient has recovered completely from the surgery.

The first-of-its-kind device is similar to an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), which delivers electrical pulses to the heart to prompt it to beat a normal rhythm and provides a new alternative treatment to vagus nerve stimulation and surgical removal of the focus site – parts in the brain where the seizures originate — for people with intractable epilepsy.

Prior to last month’s surgery, the only implants of the seizure-reducing medical device took place at U.S. medical centers that had previously researched the device’s effectiveness and safety, making NYU Langone the first non-study hospital in the U.S. and New York metropolitan area to offer the RNS System to patients.

“Medically intractable epilepsy is often a debilitating disorder that puts sufferers at risk from sudden loss of consciousness and uncontrolled movements. It stigmatizes patients and restricts their independence,” said Dr. Doyle. “Epilepsy surgery is an important therapeutic option for patients, which can significantly or completely control their seizures and return their lives to normal. The RNS device improves our ability to control seizures with surgery and now offers patients who may not have been surgical candidates in the past a surgical option.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 2.3 million Americans suffer from epilepsy, with about one in 26 people expected to be diagnosed in their lifetimes. Approximately one-third of patients do not respond to medications and face major challenges with daily living. Uncontrolled seizures may interfere with normal activities such as working, going to school and driving. Patients also face increased risk for anxiety, depression, injury, brain damage, and in rare cases, death.

The RNS System, manufactured by NeuroPace Inc. of Mountain View, Calif., is a responsive stimulation device that’s implanted in the skull along with brain electrodes to detect abnormal electrical activity in the brain associated with seizures. After two or more weeks of recording the activity, doctors program the device to specifically respond to these abnormal signals by delivering imperceptible electrical pulses to the brain that normalize the activity. The device essentially “reboots” the portion of the brain where the seizure is originating, thereby effectively interrupting the abnormal electrical activity before it spreads or causes its unwanted effects.

The RNS System received pre-market approval from the Food and Drug Administration in November 2013 to treat patients’ seizures that have not been controlled by two or more antiepileptic medications.

In clinical trials performed at medical centers across the U.S., including at Saint Barnabas Medical Center in New Jersey by Dr. Doyle and Orrin Devinsky, MD, director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at NYU Langone, 55 percent of patients experienced a 50 percent or greater reduction in seizures two years post implantation.

“The RNS System represents one of the most important and innovative therapies to treat people with epilepsy,” says Dr. Devinsky. “This new surgical therapy uses information to target and shut down points in the brain where seizures start without removing tissue, providing a novel option for patients with uncontrolled seizures.”

For more information follow the source link below.

Source: Newswise